Posts Tagged ‘Urban Exploration’

Less than two months into 2016, it’s already looking like a big and busy year for Beyond the Point! We have many exciting things to show off in the coming months, ranging from our Secrets of Severalls documentary, to a completely new fresh look for Beyond the Point as we revamp our website.

So the first news update is that Beyond the Point getting a complete revamp. We’re a non-profit history organisation although we don’t want to be stuck in the past and as we approach 5 years since Beyond the Point was founded we’ve decided that this is an ideal time to modernise the site. We’re in the process of designing a brand new website, one that is much more user-friendly and easier to navigate. A large amount of the content is being tweaked, including some of older content which isn’t quite up to our current standards and many more locations will also be added to our website. This is a really exciting time for BTP and our biggest change to date. Our new and improved website will be going live later on in the year.

Secrets of Sevs UpdateAlso to be released later this year is our Secrets of Severalls documentary and news of its production is certainly getting out there, not just from a few likes on Facebook but from a television broadcast advertising the making of our documentary to a 6-page spread in the Digital FilmMaker Magazine (no pressure then!) Ever since we had the green light from the NHS in September last year, we knew that this was going to be quite a big project for us, one that would be quite a step up from our normal calibre. Since announcing that production has started, we’ve had tens of thousands of views online, hundreds of messages and a massive interest from a many people.

Earlier this week we headed back up to the Severalls site to be interviewed by ITV News Anglia for a report that they were doing on the future of the site. This was transmitted on Monday evening and got the word out that we were the last people to film there. If you have any memories of photos of Severalls Hospital then please contact us. You can see the ITV News report below.

All rights to the VT are owned by ITV News.

The Digital FilmMaker Magazine also snapped up this story. The Digital FilmMaker is a national magazine exploring the behind the scenes and the making of short films and features various articles on the latest filming equipment and projects. We are delighted to have a 6 page spread, offering an in-depth look at the planning and organising of this documentary so far. You can see a sneak preview below and can purchase a copy of the magazine in shops such as WHSmith.

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For those who haven’t visited Beyond the Point before, we are an award winning organisation dedicated to revealing the unseen history of Essex and beyond. Ranging from everything from Medieval castles to nuclear bunkers, we follow our goal to enlighten you on the usually skimmed-over parts of local history. Read more about us…

Howdy BTP readers! As Christmas day quickly approaches, so does the new year which means another year of exploring a vast variety of site along with a hefty collection of photographs and video clips. Our latest documentary for BTP is something quite different…

Beyond the Point has been given exclusive access to film a documentary on the derelict Severalls Hospital site in Colchester. This documentary is particularly special as the NHS has declined every single filming request (except ours) for those wanting to film on the site, even to major broadcasters such as the Discovery Channel. Therefore, Beyond the Point will be the only organisaation to have filmed legally on the site, both to date and probably in the entire time that the hospital is standing. The site was opened in 1913 as ‘Severalls Asylum’, a psychiatric hospital, and provided psychiatric care for North Essex until it closed in 1997. The massive 300 acre site was built to house up to 2,000 patients and the site was built based on the ‘Echelon plan’ where staff and patients could move around the site without going outside. If you have memories of Severalls Hospital, why not post them in our new Facebook Group, dedicated entirely to the hospital?

When asylums were first built in the late 1800’s, they were placed away from towns although they were a community in their own right as asylums were built with farms, laundry facilities, staff housing, shops and everything needed to live on the site. Mental health had quite a stigma attached to it at the time and little was known about curing it. Women could be admitted for struggling with a large family or for even being raped. This led to some scientists and doctors to experiment with treatments including electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy.

Paul Lindup flying his drone

Our documentary will explore the history from when Severalls opened up until it closed and will show what the site is currently like. We’ve pulled out all the stops for this documentary and have teamed up with Airbourne Imagery who are providing us with some amazing drone shots of the site. We also have helicopter footage from ITV News. In the new year we’ll be speaking with former staff members about their time at the site and will publishing our documentary around mid 2016.

To find out more about this project and to see early production photos visit our production website, JoeMander.com. You can also get regular updates about the documentary by liking Globlue on Facebook. We’ll be posting an article focussing on the history of the site, alongside our current photos, in the new year. If you have any photos or memories of the site, then please don’t hesitate to Contact Us. You can watch a teaser below:

 

Press Features:

Daily Gazette Feature | East Anglian Daily Times | Maldon Standard | Chelmsford Weekley News

The Corringham Light Railway was a line built in 1899, opened in 1901, as part of access to the Kynochs munitions factory on the site of what is now Coryton. It went from the London Fenchurch/Tilbury/Southend line at Thames Haven down to Corringham and Kynochtown to allow for transport to and from the munitions site but was used as late as 1971 for oil refining activities.

The line has been at first glance removed without trace, but plenty of remnants begin to appear when you follow the line closely which we did in 2013 with the Corringham Light Railway Preservation Society with great thanks to Lisa Sargent. We found remains of the CLR and Kynochs munitions works all the way from the housing area near the Pegasus Club in Stanford-le-Hope out into the remote farmers fields where we stopped. We found ponds near the Pegasus Club that would’ve been used for brick works serving the railway, as well as sewage works left by Kynochs serving the works colony, and also Brickfield Bridge now in the water-logged fields that the CLR would’ve run over. Trackbed remains such as sleepers, and surrounding fences, still survive too. The station platform at the start of the CLR also surves in a garden in a residential area. Inside Coryton refinery, which is of course heavily guarded due to terrorist threats, the 1919 Coryton Station platform survives.

Read, watch, and explore the historic building then and now here: http://beyondthepoint.co.uk/historic-locations/canvey-island/the-red-cowking-canute-pub-1800s-present/

Recently BTP Joe and I were allowed an exclusive glimpse at the hidden cellars of the King Canute pub on Canvey Island. The current owner was keen to let us photograph and explore the building, respecting the history of the building himself. He told us a new sign is in the making which suggests the dormant pub; currently a temporary ‘market’, might see rejuvenation in the future. However the cellar itself was water-logged and very damp – will the mould and structural deterioration bring the unused historic structure down before it sees a new life?

Inside the cellar we could see that much of the walls were painted original brick, probably from when the building was constructed in 1937. A more recent breeze block section had been added at a later date inside what would’ve been a large basement which extends to the span of the building. Various traces of the cellar’s former use were visible, from beer pumps under the bar to fizzy drink labels. It would have been used pretty regularly right up until the pub closed in early 2014, judging by the recent signs and other furnishings scattered around.

Coalhouse Point where the Thames suddenly narrows was home to several defences since 1402, and a D-shaped artillery battery fort stood here from 1539. The fort was replaced in 1799 with Coalhouse Fort which was rebuilt in 1847 and 1860. The large moat you can see to prevent invaders reaching the fort is a techonological remnant from Medieval defences around traditional castles – Coalhouse/East Tilbury Battery built down the road around 25 years later used a spiked metal fence instead in a ditch which is a step away from the use of moats. We visited the fort in January 2013 but did not get to look inside. The fort was designed to be used to create a ‘triangle of fire’ with Shornemead Fort and Cliffe Fort in Kent, of similar design, against a French attack which seemed more dangerous with their development of the ‘ironclad’ warship in 1859 which was much stronger against explosive and incediary rounds which would cause wooden ships to set alight.

In the park around the fort there was several defences built in the Second World War – from a spigot mortar mount that the Home Guard would’ve fired a mortar shell from, to an XDO Minefield Control Tower than would be used to watch over and detonate a minefield places out in the Thames incase of German craft trying to invade. Liam and I squeezed into this via one of the firing slits (loopholes) and struggled to get out again. I was boosted by Liam to get out with help of our guests, Sam and Jack, pulling from the other side, but there was now no-one to boost BTP Liam out! He had to stack up wooden pallets lying around in the tower under the loophole and still had to be pulled out so hard I thought I might be stretched in-half!

Just south of the fort lies a quick-fire battery built in the early 20th Century presumably standing ready for use through WW1, equipped with 12pdr guns. The guns would’ve been mounted on a metal rail to allow them to be turned and fired/loaded in quick succession hence its name; the rapid fire battery.

On the river Thames foreshore just south of the fort lies an early radar tower built in the Second World War. because radar was a very secret British technology initally the tower was named ‘water tower’ on maps to avoid attention. Through the Second World War the fort was fitted with a Degaussing Station to ensure friendly ships leaving Tilbury Docks were sufficiently proofed (‘degaussed’) from magnetic mines put out in the river to catch the enemy – the only other example of one of these dates from the Cold War on Canvey Island and is now an excellent military history museum.

The first defences in this area were built druing the late Middle-Ages in 1402 to defend the village from a French attack, consisting of towers and earthworks. A blockhouse and jetty once stood near the site of the radar tower. The blockhouse was built under Henry VIII in 1540 as part of the coastal defence scheme, and would’ve held 15 cannons. This was upgraded to house 27 guns 7 years later, with a range of 1-mile. More recently a jetty was built on this site in the Victorian Era to serve the fort as barges would bring in supplies and armaments and the sleepers from this railway link still stand.

Map of defences/military remains along the Thames from Kent County Council

Map of defences/military remains along the Thames from Kent County Council

To see what other remains we’ve covered in the local area, check out our Interactive Map where you explore the sites we’ve covered.

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Now lying derelict with overgrown grass, collapsed ceilings and smashed windows, this building once held over a thousand students and staff. With the building getting older year on year and student numbers on the up, the school packed up its bags in 2011 and moved to a brand new school building, leaving this site to decay. With written permission from the property owners, we proceeded to the site of my (BTP Joe’s) old school, to tour the decaying site with the previous headteacher Russell Sullivan.

Please note that this was a permission only visit and  you should not attempt to access the site for both your safety and trespassing laws. There is 24/7 security on site.

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The site has been left empty for the past three years with no plans for re-using the buildings. Occasionally, Essex Police have used the exterior and interior of the school for armed police exercises and bullet shells are scattered around with police tape covering doors and windows of the building. Over an extended Christmas break at end of the 2011, staff packed up all of the equipment, books and more to move them to their brand new site at Canvey’s town centre. In January 2012, staff and students moved into the new building, with staff having to leave furniture and memories behind.

A final message from students and staff

Castle View School opened its brand news doors to the new £2.4 million state of the art school in 1980 as the 3rd secondary school on Canvey Island, due to increased pupil numbers, joining Cornelius and Furtherwick Park. The school welcomed a year group at a time, starting with 150 year 7 pupils. The school building was built in two phases, with the main building being built first followed by the second part (the now sports block) afterwards. Beyond the Point has tracked down the first head teacher of the site and also the head teacher who oversaw the planning for the new build; Jack Telling and Russell Sullivan.

CVS Futuristic

The building was designed by County Hall architect David Schreiber and was built in only 18 months. It had been planned to be built in three phases, although only two of the stages ended up being constructed. With only one year starting at a time, the building work didn’t prove too intrusive to pupils or staff. The main block was described in local newspapers as ‘space age’ due to it being solar heated as the heat of the sun would warm the building up. The following year in February 1981, the school was officially opened.

The Headteacher who opened the school was Jack Telling, who came from a Colchester school where he was deputy head for six years. Jack was appointed Head one term in advance of the opening when the building was at foundation level and had the opportunity to discuss with the architect aspects of of the building. It was Jack who oversaw the official opening for the school and secured its place within the community.

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Beyond the Point also managed to track down some of the first students. Karen Daykin-Woodberry (front left) was in the second year of students there. Karen remembers how great the school was, it even appeared on TV for being so advanced but she also recalls jealousy from other schools who didn’t like the fact that Castle View was so modern. Another key thing that Karen recalls is how friendship lasts as over 30 years later she is still friends with the Head Girl from her year, Kerry Starling (front right). Kerry also recalls how the school was great; the facilities, the technology, the new hockey pitch and music department and Kerry says she felt privileged to be there.

From The Evening Echo 10/10/1980

Jack remained at the school for 6 years, leaving in 1986 (see right), to become the head of St. Martins school in Brentwood. Taking over from him was Eileen Simmons. Eileen remained at the school until 1997. One of the biggest changes during her time at the school was the introduction of the maths block. This was added in 1994 when the school became grant maintained. The set of maths classrooms was officially opened by Falklands War Hero Simon Weston and the building became known as the Simon Weston building from then on.

Taking over in 1997 was Russell Sullivan who is the longest serving head teacher to date. Asking Russell if he remembers his first day, he responded “My first day? Yes, very well.” Russell joined Castle View in 1997, the day after the Nation learnt of Princess Diana’s death. Russell remembers how he arrived at the start of the new term with students and staff shocked by her death. Russell’s first assemblies at the school started with a minute’s silence in memory of the Princess. Over the next thirteen years at the school, Russell had welcomed myself to Castle View (in 2008), he had introduced new state of the art science labs and started planning for the new £28 million building, over ten times the cost of the original school. Upon Russell leaving the current head teacher joined the school, Gill Thomas, who oversaw the finalisation of the plans and the transition into the new building. (Also, when I started at Castle View in 2008, I was in the same class as her son, Daniel!)

Russell Sullivan, back left.

Click to view larger: The back of the new Castle View School

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“We were saddened by the images of the buildings now rapidly falling into disrepair and being ravaged by vegetation.”

Speaking to Russell, Jack, Karen and Kerry, they all agreed that the building looked a sorry sight and Russell agrees that it was still right for the school to move to a new building.

Although the old Castle View was well looked after and respected by its pupils, it was becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to maintain. It was also becoming rather cramped given increasing numbers of pupils. Added to that, we thought that the young people of Canvey deserved better in terms of attractive, state of the art facilities and was so pleased that we were able to seal the deal, after four years of planning, before I retired. Admittedly, it is a shame that more thought has not been given to how the Meppel Avenue site could be used more constructively as a whole. The new college, which was part of our original vision, is a welcome additional opportunity for the young people. – Russell Sullivan

We were saddened by the images of the buildings now rapidly falling into disrepair and being ravaged by vegetation. I hope that an alternative use can be be found for the buildings but in the event of them being demolished let me know so that I can say that I witnessed the birth and death of Castle View at Mepple Avenue. The new buildings look splendid and I wish the new school every success. – Jack Telling

Definitely a shame to see it so neglected. You’ve got to laugh at the old technology now – solar heating and computers! – Kerry Starling

We contacted Castle View School although had no response.

School Prospectus Photos – Summer 2002

Opening of the new Sports and Science Department – October 11th 2004

The Old Site – 2014